Advanced Fundamentals for the Golf "Sling" Shot

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How you hit the ball as a beginning, recreational player changes as you develop your game.  You will want to individualize basic fundamentals.  The central theme of this website is the use of a hands free golf sling motion.  The sling shot is an "inside/out" swing motion.  The creation of such a motion begins, as does every skill with an understand of pre-swing fundamentals.  In this case the adaptations needed to play super confident golf.

Grip

The sling motion requires a weakened grip.  The general idea is to place your hands on the club in a manner that causes your thumbs to be on top of the shaft at impact.  This sling style involves the ability to move the handle of the club.  The placement and movement of your thumbs controls the clubface.

The sling motion requires a weakened grip.  The general idea is to place your hands on the club in a manner that causes your thumbs to be on top of the shaft at impact.  This sling style involves the ability to move the handle of the club.  The placement and movement of your thumbs controls the clubface.

Your hands will act as a semi-rigid swivel joint.  They will have nearly normal range of motion, but will not flip-flop around.  The grip pressure in you hands will be light, but the wrists will be slight firmer.  The back of your top wrist with generally face the target rather than being turned over the top of the shaft in a stronger position (11 o'clock in this illustration). 

 

 

 

 

Alignment

The sling motion requires a slightly open body alignment.  We want the hips to be "pre-cleared" at address to reduce the need for any substantial leg drive.  The hips will naturally clear at then end of the transition.  The "Bump" move in the transition is a relatively soft rotation and forward weight transfer.  It is NOT a power move as often described in other golf instruction.  The hips lead the shoulders which in turn sling the arms.  The rotation of the shoulders closely follows the movement of the hips.  Unless you know what your are looking for, the timing may appear to be coincidental.  When the hips have returned to their address position, the shoulders are still closed to the target line.  Subsequently, the arms are pulled into the sling by the power created by your shoulder rotation.   At impact the hips have fully opened while the shoulders have only reached a square position relative to the target line.  The arms are just beginning to show any substantial downward movement.  It is critical to develop a feel for the arms lagging behind the body. To get the back of the left hand "square" to the target, the ball must be played slightly forward in the stance.  In a good sling motion, you will feel as if you are swinging "out" at the ball.

 

 

Ball Position and Stance Width

The sling motion allows you to control the shape of the shot through ball position.  To create a fade shot, the ball is moved slightly forward of it's ideal ball position for a straight shot.  For a draw shot, the ball is moved slightly back.  To promote a full weight transfer and to get arm extension, a slightly wider stance is preferred.

 

 

Forward Sling

Once these preswing adaptations are made, the in-swing movement is nearly automatic.  The forward swing concept is reduce to slinging the handle towards the target.  This needs to be a mindless effort created by correct practice.  The muscular force comes for the sling created by the rotation of the shoulders.  Again, the wrists only act as semi-rigid connectors.  There is zero conscious hand action to produce last moment power.  The handle is move as if it were a weighted steel rod.  The movement should be no faster than you can feel the position and movement of the handle.

 

 

 

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